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's speech. the question this morning, does new technology create better jobs? we will show you the opinion piece that is prompting our question. here are a couple of ways to participate in the discussion, as usual. by phone -- make sure you mute your television or radio when you call in. you can reach us on twitter or facebook. or send journal@c-span.org us an e-mail, the e-mail address is -- or send us an e-mail, the address is journal@c-span.org. the front page this morning of t,"e washington pos the headline -- part of the reporting this morning area did president obama will be speaking on the actual anniversary day at the lincoln memorial. that is coming up on wednesday. here's the front page of the new york times and their front page photo from the march yesterday -- e froml play you mor that. comeshnology and jobs, it in an opinion peas from "the new york times," written by two economics professors. they write -- the unemployment rate is stuck at levels not seen since the early 1990s. the portion of adults working is four percentage points below its peak in 2000. our question to you
need to stay on this course of putting through these technology-grounded efficiency rules for a whole range of appliances and the like. in fact, on analogies point i would raise a 2001 report from the national academy of sciences that exams d. o. e. fossil and energy efficiency port portfolio in the first twenty years. and concluded that the 22 programs the analyzed which cost about $13 billion total between '78 and 2001 yield the economic benefits of about $40 billion. so a return on investment. i think but an interesting part of the story is the study attributed -- to three efficiency programs that cost $11 million. even relatively small efficiency programs can yield results both in economic benefit and reduction of carbon emission. regoing to be strongly focused on advancing this energy efficiency agenda in multiple do main and certainly our responsibility with rulemaking i will assure you we will maintain strong pressure in this direction. another key provision of the president's climate plan districts epa to issue rules for cutting carbon emissions for new and existing power plan
unfree. and over some number of decades became much for your and much were democratic. >> does technology eventually make democracy inevitable? >> one of the observations that we can with actually came from me and mark. we were in the mr a little over a month ago, less than 1% as access to the unit. one of the worst decade shift in the entire world. now it's in some country and session. still very much speculative about whether its democratic transition. what was interesting about myanmar and perhaps something that shocked even us is even the less than 1% of the population has access to the internet everyone had heard of it. they understood the unit as a set of values, as a concept as an id even before they experienced it as a user or a tool. the understanding was not based on a chinese interpretation but it was not based on autocrats version. they understood in terms of its western value of the free flow of information and civil liberties. what that means to us is your 57% of the world's population living under some kind of an autocracy. what happens when they try to create an autocratic
the school bus. several companies are competing for the business. >> technology itself and iris image is nothinging more than the colored portion of your eye. every time a child boards and/or exits the school bus, the parent will get an e-mail or text message and they will get that image of the child's photograph. google map of where they boarded or exited the school bus as well as the time and date. >> reporter: eye lock is another rice scanning company. its technology is being use order school buses along with high security offices and banks. >> our scanning for security la around for a while. but it is getting more popular. that's because advances in technology mean the scanners can be built quicker and cheaper. this scanner is for airports. >> welcome. welcome. >> reporter: while iris scanning may be effective, it does raise concerns, especially when it is used in schools. >> i would -- wonder where the database for this information is going to go naturally. >> reporter: for now, the information collected by the scanners is owned by the school district. but as the market expands,
learned that our adversaries were moving to nonmetallic devices. we adapted our screening technology and tactics to counter that. learned that a single vulnerability in any part of the aviation system can make everyone connected to it vulnerable. since we don't control security at foreign airports, we have to work even more closely with international partners to raise the overall security of the system. we did that. shortly after the christmas day plot, i launched a worldwide initiative to make these needed changes in close collaboration with our strongest allies. i am proud to say that i october of 2010, this effort led to 190 countries signing onto an historic agreement to improve aviation security, standards, and technology and information sharing. i have had the chance to visit many of those countries over the past 4.5 years. continentscross six -- however, our work did not end there. following the 20 10 air cargo threat which involved bombs hidden inside printer cartridges departing on international planes to the united states, we launched a second initiative to work with intern
that is one tough nut to crack. figure out how to deploy smart grid technology. it is one of more than 130 smart grid projects in 44 states. the 300 homeowners are connected to the conventional grid. but are trying out added features. sort of like the first families to get digital cable. >> this is real similar to a pharmaceutical clinical trials effort but it is on electricity and consumer electronics. >> former austin city councilman runs the project with federal stimulus money with help from utilities, corporations and charitable foundations. washington has invested $3.4 billion to help develop smart grid technologies nationwide. the private sector has ponied up an additional $4.7 billion. >> when you say we are developing a smart grid that implies what we have is a dumb grid. is it dumb? >> when you have a mechanical grid of mechanical devices that have to be individually read and something goes wrong how do you find out about it? >> and that was a big part of the problem at the end of june when a swath of powerful thunderstorms spawned so-called windstorms that knocked down thousands
stacking. we have to deploy our resources better, get a department more technologically advanced and have to have more boots on the ground. without that you're not going to form the city as a safe city. it's also an issue with training. it's an issue with leadership. so we have to do all those things, chuck. >> benny napoleon, one of the two candidates that's going to meet in the november runoff. thanks for coming on. we invited mike duggan to come on the show as well. we look forward to interviewing him. up next, the coverage of the historic 50th march on washington we're honored to be joined by a historian taylor branch and director of national museum of history and culture, lonny bunch. they will be here to talk about the ongoing fight for rights. go to "the daily rundown" on msnbc if you want more for the race on detroit mayor. the conversation continues all day long on our facebook page. we even like comments that are not insulting. you're watching "the daily rundown" only on msnbc. our medis sit down with you and ask. being active. and being with this guy. [ male announcer ] getting
, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: walt mossberg, has technology plateaued? >> guest: oh, no, absolutely not. absolutely not. technology is always changing and always coming up with -- technology companies are always coming up with something new, and there are new technology companies all the time incubating, a lot of them are in what we call stealth mode. we don't even know who they are. certain technologies plateau and things move on, but in general, no. not at all. >> host: i guess i ask that because the last couple years we've had the explosion of smartphones, we've had tablets come online. what's out there? >> guest: well, first of all, there are vast numbers of people especially in the less developed cups, but even in the developed countries who don't own a smartphone and, certainly, there are vast thurms that don't own -- numbers that don't own a tablet. to give you a rough example, apple -- which leads in the tablet market -- has sold somewhere around 160 million ipads since 2010. that's a remarkable achievement and for people that own appl
your kids to do well in school. >> i am mostly struck by how different things are now. the technology is such that you can get it -- mob to show up and dance in the middle of pennsylvania avenue if you wanted but to get 253,000 people against the mall, there would be old horns, pulpits, it was remarkable and to me, i would like for young people to understand the enormity of what it took to do that. >> and a very short time, a group of people came together because they believed in something and they put together the most unbelievable moment in american history. >> for the legacy on the march in washington to go or word, to the young people who want to be see thatts, to really they have an obligation to cover poverty, cover race, go deeper to find the real story. >> julian. >> we are missing the pbs video documentary on the march tonight because we have to be here. >> but it will be online. [laughter] the march,came to ordinary men and women dressed like they're going to church because many believe they were going to church. >> andrew. >> the world came together around an idea that all
graders less than half will graduate high school. in this day and age in particular with technology being so prevalent one must have certain skills that you receive through a formal education to have a job and keep a job. so my focus has been on making sure these children who are predominantly poor or minority are a priority for us and particularly in the elementary school years. we can't afford to have up 240% of elementary school students be chronically truant. that's a focus for me. >> right now the head of the naacp is speaking. let's listen. >> somewhere along the way white sheets were traded for white but don't down shirts. attack dogs and water hoses were traded for tasers and widespread implementation of stop-and-frisk policies. nooses were traded for handcuffs. somewhere along the way we gain new enemies, cynicism and complacency. murders from urban america to suburban america. the pursuit of power for power's sake. we stand here today to say it is time to wake up. so here in 2013 we stand before the statue of the great emancipator. we look towards the statue of the great liberat
's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. >>> the march to complete the dream continues. that's next. even though it's the best idea ever. but dress for success right? so we started using tide, bounce and downy together. it keeps our clothes looking newer longer and like a million bucks oh, maybe we could sell our clothes [ female announcer ] tide, bounce and downy. great on their own, better together ♪ now you can give yourself a kick in the rear! v8 v-fusion plus energy. natural energy from green tea plus fruits and veggies. need a little kick? ooh! could've had a v8. in the juice aisle. need a little kick? ooh! how can i help you? oh, you're real? you know i'm real! at discover, we're always here to talk. good, 'cause i don't have time for machines. some companies just don't appreciate the power of conversation! you know, i like you! i like you too! at discover, we treat you like you'd treat you. get the it card and talk to a real person. >>> tens of thousands of people gathered today to mark th
we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ >>> one of the people most impressed with dr. king's speech back in 1963 was a man who knew a thing or two himself about giving a speech. president john f. kennedy. taylor branch who was with us earlier writes president kennedy watched king's speech on tv. he was impressed with how effortlessly he broke into his "i have a dream" refrain. branch says kennedy turned to his aides and remarked he's damn good. certainly was. we'll be right back. nascar is ab.out exciteme
life and the transplant surgerying with the whole body of technology and development of medicine, cleats cholesterol, we tell that story through my case and laid against the background of my time in public service. and i was uniquely blessed in many respects, obviously, you can never express enough gratitude for a donor or the donor's family. you cannot talk about what i went through and i survived it what without talking about liz, her sister, and my wife. we celebrate our 40th wedding anniversary next week. [applause] i -- when you go through everything we went through as a family, and the only way to go through it is as a family, if at all possible. i wake up every morning with a smile on my face thankful for a new day i never expected to see. and basically what the book is about, it's simon and shuster love it. it's called heart, american medical odyssey. i think it's a pretty good book. it's not political. it has nothing to do with politics. i suppose you could say that all of pry my critics say i never had a heart. [laughter] may want to have that problem -- this challenge
. some lead in industrial and technological revolution. some in world war ii. arlington cemetery, so close to where we are right now, we can hear the whisper of those brave names, sullivan, fernandez. today, 50 million american latinos demand our rights, rights given to us not by the man who fell in philadelphia who themselves are immigrants and children of immigrants. no, the rights are given to us by god. what we demand is simple. first, we are americans. treat us as such, invest in our neighborhoods, our house, our education. second, we demand a vote. tear down the barriers to voting, don't bring us more. finally, and the second-class citizenship of 5 million children in 6 million parents.♪ >> our next two speakers, professor charles ogletree, harvard law school, and chair of the united we dream, sofia campos. >> thank you so much. it is a pleasure being here. let me say this first, i want to salute our first african- american governor elected twice in massachusetts, deval patrick. i want to support the great lawyers from florida who represented the families of trayvon martin, d
and maintaining our technological upgradinge are not our roads and our bridges and our transportation systems in our infrastructure, all things that we can afford to do right now and should be doing right now and would put people to work right now -- if we don't do those things, then 20 years from now, already years from now, we will have fallen further and further behind. when we get back to washington, when congress gets back to washington, this is going to be a major debate. this is the same debate we have been having for the last two years. the difference is now the ready coming down here what we should be thinking about is how do we grow an economy so that we are creating a thriving middle class and more ladders of opportunity for those who are willing to work hard to get into the middle class. and my position is going to be that we can have a budget that is sensible, that is not spent on programs that don't work, but it does spend wisely on those things that will help ordinary people succeed. all right? good. -- it is a general mental the turn. this gentleman right here has had his hand
and nursing homes. then, believe it or not, technology is factoring into this as well. technology actually helped drive this change because social media keeps us all connected. who knows, living alone doesn't feel as lonely. but that's sad if you rely on facebook as your companion. so as of last year, the numbers are this. 27% of households were made up of people living alone. compare that to 17% in 1970. carol? >> what about all of those boomerang kids that moved in with their parents? they need company. >> that's a good point. that did happen, the boomerang kids moving in with their parents. it's still happening. a lot of kids out of college moved home to save money to look for a job. so, yeah, everybody still has company. they are all still living together. but here's the thing. even as many young adults still live with their parents, single people are still starting their own households and that trend goes back to 1970. it shows there's a big shift to having smaller households now. people are having fewer kids and many people are saving up money and buying a place of their own even if
this postponement they say is due to technology. we all are familiar now with the debt clock. there is also the cost. if they implement any parts and they don't work it could cost even more. how does the president develop a strategy that actually gets this plan to move past all of this? >> the key real date that matter, jamie, is january 1st. that is when all the policies or actual insurance policies, health insurance policies would go into effect. , what you're seeing today, today's revelation isn't all that great. it doesn't, what they're talking about doing is delaying these exchanges going into the marketplace, oregon already said it would do that. move it from october first to october 15th. the administration promised everything would start on time but we're talking about 20% of the nation's economy being altered here by this law. whether the marketplace exchanges go into, into place october 1st or october 12th doesn't really matter. what matters is that the marketplace opens up sometime in october and that the policies go into effect on january 1st. and at that point i do agree, at some point
nascar fan and media engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. how can i help you? oh, you're real? you know i'm real! at discover, we're always here to talk. good, 'cause i don't have time for machines. some companies just don't appreciate the power of conversation! you know, i like you! i like you too! at discover, we treat you like you'd treat you. get the it card and talk to a real person. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ >>> welcome back to "the ed show." we love hearing from our view
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with bombs, but chemical weapons can only be destroyed with very, very sensitive technology that incinerates them or chemically neutralizes them. you can't drop a bomb on a bunker and expect it to neutralize the capabilities. bomb the bunker and throw them all over the desert and perhaps throw these containers of some agent that could be picked up by somebody and used in a terrorist attack. highly unlikely we will go after the sites themselves that contain the weapons, but we'll probably attack things that allow them to employee these kinds of weapons. things like airfields, like command and control facilities, military headquarters. perhaps airplanes, airfields, those things that would allow the syrian military to employee gas against its citizens. >>> from what you've heard, does this seem like a symbolic attack, or could it actually do some good? >> i think we need to temper our expectations. this is a very limited attack, what's being discussed is a very limited military attack. i think that the best we could hope for is to deter mr. assad from using the chemical weapons again. but it's
and technology and infrastructure, our borders are now better staffed and better protected than at any time in our nations history. it illegal crossings have dropped to 40-year lows. we also set commonsense immigration priorities with a focus on criminals, national security and public safety threats, repeat offenders, and egregious emigration file leaders. last year, we remote more serious criminals from the united states than at any time in our history. we strengthened our work to combat transnational criminal organizations including those that commit cyber crime and financial fraud, violate international property and prey upon human life. as part of our effort, we established the dhs loop campaign to unify the departments work to fight the worldwide scourge of human trafficking. while important, we still need to make sure that future changes we needed to make further changes to create a more flexible, fair, and focused emigration system. we instructed our immigration agents and officers to use their discretion under current law to not pursue low priority immigration cases. like children b
of technology and the george washington university. to my far right, again, only in geography, andrew young. he was a close aide to dr. martin luther king. he helped organize the march on washington. he was a former congressman, mayor of atlanta, and ambassador to the united nations. he is currently a professor at the andrew young school of policy studies at your estate university. to my left, gwen ifill, reporter and managing editor of pbs's washington week. she has covered seven presidential campaigns, moderated two vice presidential debates. before that, she worked for nbc, the new york times, and the washington post. in this business, she is regarded as one of the best. to my right, julian bond, one of the leaders of the civil rights movement while a student at morehouse college. he helped found the student nonviolent coordinating committee. in 1998, he was elected chairman of the naacp, the national association for the advancement of colored people. he was also elected to the georgia house and senate. he has been a radio and television commentator and is currently a professor at both ameri
and sophistication in targeting technologies. he is with the department of technology. >> let's see how this works. imagine there is a couple out there expecting a baby, and they go on line immediately to look up the word pregnancy. what happens? >> right away they've shared with google that they're interested in pregnancy. so they can add that to the profile and then i start clicking on links. >> with every click powerful marketing companies drop electronic cookies onto our couple's track to record their browsing history, what they looked at and for how long, and how much they spend. some may even link to the couple's real world shopping habits, noting that they purchased a home pregnancy test. ask sudden and suddenly in their e-mails, on their smartphones, on social media sites comes an avalanche of ads for baby strollers, car seats, cribs and much more. >> and all of this could happen before the couple even tells their family that they're pregnant. >> yeah, there are hundreds of companies in the advertising game, and they could drop a cookie saying this person is searching pregnancy. >> if you
costs and lengthen lives. nor can we stop investing in science and technology to train our young people of all races for the jobs of tomorrow. and to act on what we learned about our bodies, our businesses, and our climate. we must push open those stubborn gates. we cannot be discouraged by a supreme court decision that said we don't need this critical provision in the voting rights act because, look at the states. it made it harder for african-americans and hispanics and students and the elderly and the infirmed and poor working folks to vote. what do you know? they showed up, stood in line for hours and voted anyway. so obviously we don't need any kind of law. [ applause ] but a great democracy does not make it harder to vote than to buy an assault weapon. we must open those stubborn gates. and let us not forget that while racial divides persist and must not be denied, the whole american landscape is littered with the lost dreams and dashed hopes of people of all races. and the great irony of the current moment is that the future has never brimmed with more possibilities. it has never
information technologies. if they can shave a year off of designing a new airplane engine, they can save billions of dollars from their economy. >> avoiding such spying is not easy. you can travel with cheap, disposable phone, encrypt everything, or better yet leave at home everything you don't absolutely need and most of us in most of our travels will not be spied upon, but if you work in high-tech, the military or some other area, the odds do go up that when you go to see the world's sights, someone may also be looking at you. >> all right. many of us know rainn wilson from the office, but you may not know he's using his tv fame to help educate girls around the world. wilson explains in today's impact your world. >> hi there, i'm rainn wilson and today, we can make an impact on educating women an girls all around the globe. my sister like my dead great, great grandmother who died of stupidity. >> i have years, dwight. >> when i started getting well-known as an actor on "the office," i got do various things for various charities. and i had the opportunity to explore what was most import
't let you down. [ woman ] the technology in these pads... best creation ever! [ female announcer ] always infinity. the only pad made with foam not fluff so mind-blowingly thin, you'll be surprised it's up to 55% more absorbent. genius. always infinity. it'speople are now. switching to finish... you'll be surprised it's up to 55% more absorbent. ... and it's spreading all across america. quantum with power gel delivers amazing clean and shine, even in the hardest water, which cascade just can't do. take the finish shine challenge with quantum. voted product of the year by consumers ! >> barrelling north across a bridge on california's highway 101, an 18 wheeler sideswiped a little bmw and slammed like a meteor into the ravine below. as the semi exploded into flames, the bmw dangled half off the edge. improbably as it was, an occupant of the mangled little car survived. the mother, the driver, kelly groves. >> and the next thing that i remember is hitting the guardrail and having cement and debris just being slammed into my face and then it couldn't have been too long after that w
march encouraged other people to do the same thing. secondly the technological change from satellite to television and video screens and sophisticated sound systems have made marchs more accessible just more feasible. you see this cascading number of marchs to the point where -- martin luther king historian said the type has been debased by repetition. host: obviously a significant difference as we have listened to a number of oral histories. the organizational work it took to put this march together with more than 250,000, that was of course well before e-mail and twitter and other social media. this is truly a grassroots efforts. lot as changed in terms of technology. has that impacted the value of these marchs? guest: certainly the value has been has beened considerably. king's speech was carried by the satellite to nations around the world and broadcast live the only three broadcast networks. today it would take an enormous event to get that kind of attention. the technology is there to spread your message. people attention span various reasons has been so changed you really ha
and lengthen lives. nor can we stop investing in science and technology to train our young people of all races for the jobs of tomorrow, and to act on what we learned about our bodies, our businesses, and our climate. we must push open those stubborn gates. we cannot be discouraged by a supreme court decision. >> the landscape is littered with dashed dreams and lost hopes of all races. the ironry is the future never brimmed with more possibilities. it has never burned brighter in what we could become. if we push open those stubborn gates. and if we do it together. the choice remains as it was on that distant summer day 50 years ago, cooperate and thrive or fight with each other and fall behind. we should all thank god for dr. king and john lewis, and all those who gave us a dream to guide us, a dream they made for like our founders with their lives, their fortunes, their sacred honor. and we thank them for reminding us that america is always becoming, always on a journey, and we all, every single citizen among us, have to run our lap. god bless them,ed , and god bles america. >> of course, for
in science and technology to train our young people of all races for the jobs of tomorrow and to act on what we learn about our bodies, our businesses, and our climate. we must push open those stubborn gates. we cannot be discouraged by a supreme court decision that said we don't need this critical provision of the voting rights act because look at the states. it made it harder for african-americans and hispanics and students and the elderly and the infirm and poor working folks to vote. what do you know? they showed up, stood in line for hours, and voted anyway, so obviously we don't need any kind of law. but a great democracy does not make it harder to vote than to buy an assault weapon. we must open those stubborn gates and let us not forget that while racial divides persist and must not be denied, the whole american landscape is littered with the lost dreams and dashed hopes of people of all races. and the great irony of the current moment is that the future has never brimmed with more possibilities. it has never burned brighter in what we could become if we push open those stubborn gate
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center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day men's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for men's health concerns as we age. with 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day men's 50+. [ crisp crunches ] whoo-hoo-hoo! guess it was. [ male announcer ] pringles, bursting with more flavor. ♪ and now there's a new way to do the same for your dog.s. introducing new purina dog chow light & healthy. it's a no-sacrifices, calorie-light way to help keep him trim... ...with a deliciously tender and crunchy kibble blend he'll love... ...and 20% fewer calories than dog chow. discover the lighter side of strong. new purina dog chow light & healthy. >> i vhave a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. >> when martin luther king delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago there were five africa
of technology and global competition have subtracted those jobs that once provided a foothold into the middle class. reduced the bargaining power of american workers. our politics has suffered. entrenched interests, those who benefit from an unjust status quo resisted any government efforts to give working families a fair deal, marshaling an army of lobbyists and opinion makers to argue that minimum wage increases or stronger labor laws or taxes on the wealthy who could afford it to fund crumbbling schools, that all these things violated sound economic principles. we would be told that growing inequality was a price for a growing economy. a measure of the free market. that greed was good and compassion ineffective. those without jobs or health care had only themselves to blame. then there were those elected officials who found it useful to practice the old politics of division, doing their best to convince middle class americans of a great untruth, that government was somehow itself to blame foe their growing economic insecurity, that bureaucrats were taking their hard earn dollars to benefit
ourselves. the task will not be easy. since 1963 the economy's changed. the twin forces of technology and global competition have subtracted those jobs that once provided a foothold into the middle class, reduced the bargaining power of american workers. and our politics has suffered. entrenched interests, those who benefit from an unjust status quo resisted any government efforts to give working families a fair deal, marshaling an army of lobbyists to argue that stronger labor laws or taxes on the wealthy who could afford it just to fund crumbling schools, that all these things violated sound economic principles. we'd be told that growing inequality was a price for a growing economy. a measure of the free market. that greed was good and compassion ineffective. and those without jobs or health care had only themselves to blame. then there were those elected officials who found it useful to practice the old politics of division, doing their best to convince middle-class americans of a great untruth, that government was somehow itself to blame for their growing economic insecurity. that
, but we have the benefit of some gps now. anti-lock brakes and technology that we have to use at our disposal. no, we're not reinventing the wheel, we're using everything at our disposal to make sure our car goes fast. our car goes far, and we see victory in everything we're doing. >> there were i think four african-american members of congress on the day dr. martin king gave his speech. there were 44 today. how do you understand yourself as someone who is in both inherit the tradition of activism and you are within the halls of power yourself? >> well, it's absolutely what shaped my life. i remember 50 years ago, i was nine years old, i remember it very well. you have two and a half generations here. it was the struggles of the civil rights movement that absolutely shaped my life and made me make a commitment at a young age that i was going to devote my life to fighting for social and economic justice. i spent many years before being in office, being involved in direct action, studied the civil rights movement, and spent a great deal of time trying to raise the next generation. >> h
about media, technology companies. we have a massive problem. until we have jobs and freedom economic prosperity, we will continue to suffer in that regard. >> yet, what we have and this is where we can look back on this 50th anniversary how is it relevant today and the future? we can vote. we can vote with our pocketbooks and remote control. if there isn't a justice we perceive as far as not having enough adversity of our culture, we can speak and we can speak very loudly. >> one unifying color is green, right? >> yes. >> there is truth to that. >> michelle spos to that. >> you do see -- that's right. but you do see viviana, look at why things are moving faster to reaching out to hispanics. gee, there is a dollar attached to appealing to hispanics. >> absolutely. it's really interesting because in this sense, i think the business community and even the media community has been the leadership has been incredibly savvy and they realize this community is topping 1 trillion in buying power and the focus is on the women because we control the buying decisions and influence our kids. that
thing about technology. you can look things up and have it in five seconds. >>brian: or get a smart guy and say you be my best friend. coming up. it is supposed to honor the people who died on september 11, but one group says this cross is just offensive. that story ahead. >>gretchen: you can lead your kids to vegetables but you can't make them eat. details about the healthy school lunch program and how it's not working. it doesn't work at home either. ♪ ♪ >>brian: sauteed broccoli has changed our view on has changed our view on vegetables. too big. too small. too soft. too tasty. [ both laugh ] [ male announcer ] introducing progresso's new creamy alfredo soup. inspired by perfection. new cre♪my alfredo soup. ♪ i've got something for you too. (announcer) fancy feast delights with cheddar. a meal that is sure to delight your cheese lover. now available in the classic form she loves. fancy feast. the best ingredient is love. it's a reality check. i had my reality check when i'd be sitting there with my friends who had their verizon phones and i'd be sitting there like "mine's sti
also held top positions at the massachusetts institute of technology and the george washington university. right,-- to my far andrew young, an aide to martin luther king. young helped organize the march on washington. in addition he was a former congressman, a former mayor of atlanta, and a former ambassador to the united issues. he is currently professor at the andrew young skill -- school of policy studies at georgia state. ifill,eft, gwen reporter, moderator and managing "washington week vicehe has moderated two presidential debates, and before that she worked for nbc, and "the washington post," and she is regarded as one of the best. my right, julian bond, one of the leaders of the civil rights movement. studentd found the nonviolent coordinating committee. he was also elected to the georgia house and senate. he has been a radio and television almond tater and is a professor at both american university and the university of virginia. , a manmmediate left described as the conscience of the u.s. congress among john lewis, a congressman from georgia since 1986. at 23, 1 of the
stop itself if it has to. the technology may be hard to imagine... but why you would want it is not. the 2014 e-class, see your authorized mercedes-benz dealer for exceptional offers through mercedes-benz financial services. diarrhea, gas, bloating? yes! one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. live the regular life. phillips'. newspaper reporter in fort worth when martin luther king jr. spoke that day. i watched it all on television with wonder and relief-- wonder at the power of his words, relief that it had all gone so peacefully. by then, i considered myself an enlightened person on race, but i had grown up in jim crowe texas where whites and blacks lived in worlds separate in ways large and small. i never shook hands with a black person until i was in the air force-- not that i didn't want to. i just never had the occasion. they lived on one side of town. i lived on the other. schools were still mostly segregated, and the newspaper where i worked generally ignored news about black people.
engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else comes standard at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? >>> and that does it for this edition of "andrea mitchell reports." tomorrow we'll drive you live from it the historic 50th anniversary of the celebration of the march on washington. my colleague richard lui has a look at what's next on "news neig nation." >> thank you so much. in our next hour, ramping up. the u.s. could launch air strikes against syria as early as thursday. the pentagon says it's ready and is just waiting for the president to pull the trigger. the military options the u.s. is likely considering. plus, the effect this crisis is having on world markets. >>> and an investigat
success of that march encouraged other people to do the same thing. secondly, almost every technological change since then from satellite television to arena video screens and sound systems have made marches more accessible, just more feasible. you see the cascading number of marches to the point where the noted martin luther king the type hass, been debased by repetition. asx significant difference we have listened to a number of oral histories, the organizational work it took to put this work together with more than 200,000 in the sum estimated 250,000, well before e-mail and twitter and other social media, this is truly a grassroots effort. a lot has changed in terms of ideology 50 years later. has that impacted the value of these marches? klux guest: carried topeech was nations around the world by satellite, and broadcast live on the only three broadcast networks, today, it would take in a norma's event to get that kind of attention. get thatus event to kind of attention. people's attention span for various reasons has been so changed, that you really have to fight to break through t
in the speech, you have technology that has reduced manufacturing jobs that used to be a foothold into the middle class, that has reduced things like bank tellers or travel agents that used to provide a good middle-class livelihood, and the new jobs that have been produced don't pay as much. you've got global comp tirkz jobs being shipped overseas. all these things reduce the leverage workers have and as a consequence it's a lot harder for every worker-- black, white, hispanic, asian-- to ask for a raise, and employers know that. and companies are making great profits, but they're not reinvesting. so what we need to do is to go back to a principle that if you look at our economic history has always been the case-- when we have braut based growth, when the middle class does well, when people at the bottom have a shot, it turns out that's good for everybody. it's good for folks at the top. it's good for businesses because now they have people spend manager money. and a lot of what i'll be talking about over the next several months is specific steps, whether helping keep down the cos
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